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Heritage Newsletter
Shabbos Information
This week`s Torah chapter is Vayikra

Candle lighting will be at 6:53 PM

Shabbos ends at 8:14 PM
Weekly Torah

The Book of VaYikra (Leviticus) which we start reading this week, is also known as Torat Kohanim -- the Laws of the Priests. It deals largely with the korbanot (offerings) that are brought in the Mishkan (Tent of Meeting).

The first group of offerings are called `Olot`, burnt offerings. The animal is brought to the entrance of the Mishkan. Regarding cattle, the one who brought the offering sets his hands on the animal. Afterwards it is slaughtered and the Kohen sprinkles its blood on the Altar. The animal is skinned and cut into pieces. The pieces are arranged, washed and burned on the Altar. A similar process is described involving burnt offerings of other animals and birds. The various meal offerings are described. Part of these is burned on the altar and the remainder is eaten by the Kohanim. Mixing leaven or honey into the offerings is prohibited. The peace offering, part of which is burnt on the Altar and part eaten, can be either from cattle, sheep or goats.

The Torah prohibits eating blood or `Chelev` (certain fats in animals). The offerings that atone for inadvertent sins -- committed by the Kohen Gadol, by the entire community, by the prince and by the average citizen -- are detailed. Laws of the guilt-offering, which atones for certain verbal transgressions and for transgressing laws of ritual purity, are listed. The meal offering for those who cannot afford the normal guilt offering, the offering to atone for misusing sanctified property, laws of the `questionable guilt` offering and offerings for dishonesty are detailed.

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Shabbos Halacha

Havdala: Final Blessing

The normal HAvdala  ending blessing is Baruch ha’mAvdil bein kodesh l’chol.  When Saturday night is a Jewish festival, say instead Baruch ha’mAvdil bein kodesh l’kodesh.

Source: practicalhalacha.com

Rabbi Agishtein`s Halacha Corner

This Week`s Question:

I was told that tying a double knot is prohibited on Shabbos even if you plan on untying it within twenty four hours. The issue is that I sometimes cover my hair with a "Mitpachat" aka a wrap and if I don`t make a double knot it tends to come out almost immediately. What should I do?

 
 
Answer: 
 
You are correct that making a double knot is prohibited on Shabbos regardless of the amount of time it is intended to stay in for.  Specifically in regards to woman`s hair covering`s, in  Shmiras Shabbos Khilchasa (ch.15 note 175) he brings, that the custom is to allow making a double knot in the following manner. It is made loose (meaning you do not pull the knot tight).
The woman always unties the knot when she takes it off. If she tends to just slip off the whole thing while it is still tied, then it is prohibited.  For the reason behind this leniency see the note mentioned above.
 
To send in a question, call or text Rabbi Agishtein at 973-545-6756 or email him directly at acagishtein@gmail.com.
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Yom Kippur Yizkor will take place Wednesday, October 9, 11:00 AM

at Heritage Congregation, 2941 W. Touhy Ave., Chicago

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The ancient custom of recalling the souls of the departed and contributing to charity in their memory is rooted in the fundamental Jewish belief in the eternity of the soul. When physical life ends, only the body dies, but the soul ascends to the realm of the spirit where it regularly attains higher levels of purity and holiness.

When this life is over, the soul can no longer perform good deeds; that method of attaining merit is the sole province of mortal man who must struggle with the baseness and selfishness of his animal nature. But there is a way for the disembodied soul to derive new sources of merit. History is a continuum. If we, the living, give charity or do good deeds due to the lasting influence or in memory of a departed parent or other loved one, the merit is truly that of the soul in its spiritual realm. Moreover, God in His mercy credits our deed to the departed one because he or she, too, would have done the same were it possible. Even if the departed one was too poor to have made contributions to charity, the soul benefits nonetheless, because it may be assumed that he or she would have been charitable had sufficient means been available. But mere intentions do not suffice; only accomplishment can achieve this purpose. The intention to give and the fulfillment of that intention are both necessary; consequently, the pledges to charity should be redeemed as soon as possible after Yom Kippur.

It is for all these reasons that Yizkor is one of the highlights of the Yom Kippur service. The reason is neither emotional nor sentimental- although it is undeniable that Yizkor touches the most sentimental chords in the human heart - but because of the spiritual benefits it confers, both above and below.

Ashkenazic Jewry's custom of reciting Yizkor on Pesach, Shavuos, and Shemini Atzeres is of a later origin, possibly the time of the Crusades when bloody massacres wiped out many Jewish communities and seriously hurt many others.

It is virtually a universal custom that those whose parents are still living leave the synagogue during Yizkor. This is done to avoid the “evil eye”: i.e., the resentment that might be felt by those without parents toward those whose parents are still living.

Our Synagogue has Memorial Board with plaques recording the Hebrew and English name of the deceased and the Hebrew date of death.

May God remember the soul of my father, my teacher, (name of deceased) son of (name of his father) who has gone on to his world, because, without making a vow, I shall give to charity on his behalf.

As reward for this, may his soul be bound in the Bond of Life, together with the souls of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel, and Leah; and together with the other righteous men and women in the Garden of Eden.

Now let us respond: Amen.

O God, full of mercy who dwells on high, grant proper rest on the wings of the Divine presence in the lofty levels of the holy and the pure ones, who shine like the glow of the firmament for the soul of (name of deceased) son of (name of his father) who went on to his world, because, without making a vow, I will contribute to charity in remembrance of his soul.

May his resting place be in the Garden of Eden - therefore may the Master of mercy shelter him in the shelter of His wings for eternity; and may He bind his soul in the Bond of Life. Hashem is his heritage, and may he repose in peace on his resting place.

Now let us respond: Amen.

May God remember the soul of my mother, my teacher, (name of deceased) daughter of (name of her father) who has gone on to her world, because, without making a vow, I shall give to charity on her behalf.

As reward for this, may her soul be bound in the Bond of Life, together with the souls of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel, and Leah; and together with the other righteous men and women in the Garden of Eden.

Now let us respond: Amen.

O God, full of mercy who dwells on high, grant proper rest on the wings of the Divine presence in the lofty levels of the holy and the pure ones, who shine like the glow of the firmament for the soul of (name of deceased) daughter of (name of her father) who went on to her world, because, without making a vow, I will contribute to charity in remembrance of her soul.

May her resting place be in the Garden of Eden - therefore may the Master of mercy shelter her in the shelter of His wings for eternity; and may He bind her soul in the Bond of Life. Hashem is her heritage, and may she repose in peace on her resting place.

Now let us respond: Amen.

May God remember the soul of my grandmother/aunt/sister/daughter/wife (name of deceased) daughter of (name of her father) who has gone on to her world, because, without making a vow, I shall give to charity on her behalf.

As reward for this, may her soul be bound in the Bond of Life, together with the souls of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel, and Leah; and together with the other righteous women in the Garden of Eden.

Now let us respond: Amen.

O God, full of mercy who dwells on high, grant proper rest on the wings of the Divine presence in the lofty levels of the holy and the pure ones, who shine like the glow of the firmament for the soul of (name(s) of deceased) son of (name of his father) who went on to his (their) world, because, without making a vow, I will contribute to charity in remembrance of his (their) soul.

May his (their) resting place be in the Garden of Eden - therefore may the Master of mercy shelter him (them) in the shelter of His wings for eternity; and may He bind his (their) soul in the Bond of Life. Hashem is his heritage, and may he (they) repose in peace on his (their) resting place.

Now let us respond: Amen.

May God remember the souls of (all my relatives, both on my father’s side and on my mother’s side), the holy and pure ones who were killed, murdered, slaughtered, burned, drowned and strangled for the sanctification of the Name, because, without making a vow, I shall give to charity on their behalf.

As reward for this, may their souls be bound in the Bond of Life, together with the souls of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel, and Leah; and together with the other righteous men and women in the Garden of Eden.

Now let us respond: Amen. 

May God remember the souls of the communities of the House of Israel in Europe who were set to flames in the years of the Holocaust 5699 – 5705 (1939-1945) - six million men and women, boys and girls, babies, youth and elders, who were killed and exterminated with horrible cruelty, who fell as a result of mass killing in the places where they lived (in cities, towns and villages), or were sent to concentration camps, like sheep to the slaughter, who died horrible deaths and were turned into ashes in the horrible extermination camps of Germany, Poland, Russia and other countries, at the hands of German executioners and their helpers among the other nations who plotted to kill and uproot the Jewish nation, to erase the memory of Judaism and to kill anybody who bore the name of Israel. Without making a vow, I shall give to charity on their behalf. As reward for this, may their souls be bound in the Bond of Life, together with the souls of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel, and Leah; and together with the other righteous men and women in the Garden of Eden.

Now let us respond: Amen.

O God, full of mercy who dwells on high, grant proper rest on the wings of the Divine Presence in the lofty levels of the holy and the pure ones, who shine like the glow of the firmament for the souls of the holy and pure ones who were killed, murdered, slaughtered, burned, drowned and strangled for the sanctification of the Name through the hands of the German oppressors and their helpers, may their name and memory be obliterated.

Without making a vow, I will contribute to charity in remembrance of the souls of those holy and pure ones. May their resting place be in the Garden of Eden therefore may the Master of mercy shelter them in the shelter of His wings for eternity and may He bind their souls in the Bond of Life. Hashem is their heritage, and may they repose in peace on their resting places.

Now let us respond: Amen.

 
Information about deceased Male Female Information about you
I would like to order Memorial Plaque. Please send me more information


Last NameHebrew Name

If you would like to make a donation in memory of a loved one

please use the options below:

(suggested donation is $18 or $36 per name)

   
Make check to Heritage and mail it to
Heritage, 2826 W. Lunt Ave. Chicago IL 60645
Call Heritage office at 773-973-1800
to provide a credit card information
 
 

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This week's Torah reading

Tzav

The Torah addresses Aharon and his sons to teach them additional laws that relate to their service. The ashes of the 'Korban Olah' -- the korban burnt on the Altar throughout the night -- are to be removed from the area by the Kohen after he takes off his special linen clothing. The Olah is brought by someone who forgot to perform a positive commandment of the Torah. The Kohen retains the skin. The fire on the Altar must be kept constantly blazing. The 'Korban Minchah' is a meal offering that is made from flour, oil and spices. A handful of it is burned on the Altar, and a Kohen eats the remainder before it becomes leaven. The Parashah describes the special korbanot offered by the Kohen Gadol each day, and by Aharon's sons and future descendants on the day of their inauguration.


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